London: Day Three

IMG_7420

Strolling through Notting Hill

 

To start our first real day together in London, we walked from Notting Hill through Hyde Park to get to Chelsea for the most delicious brunch at The Ivy Chelsea Garden.

IMG_7421

Notting Hill

 

IMG_7423

Notting Hill

 

The Ivy is so beautiful! It’s called The Ivy Chelsea Garden for a reason – there’s beautiful outdoor seating in the garden. I’m so happy we reserved ahead of time because we had a really great table in the indoor patio. We started off with the necessary brunch cocktails, followed by two versions of poached eggs with Hollandaise on English muffins, crumpets with Marmite, and fresh fruit.

IMG_7424

The Ivy Chelsea Garden

 

IMG_7427

Indoor Patio

 

IMG_7433

Corner Table

 

IMG_7439

Outdoor fireplace

 

IMG_7429

Left, Koen’s cocktail: Sloane Ranger; long refreshing take on a Collins, with Wyborowa vodka, Green Chartreuse & pear topped with Willy’s apple cider – Right, my cocktail: Lavender Lady; Beefeater gin shaken with orange blossom, peach pulp, Briottet crème de pêche & fresh lavender sweetened with agave

 

IMG_7432

Toasted crumpets served with Marmite, mustard, and parsley butter

 

IMG_7430

Koen’s Eggs Royale: smoked salmon, two poached hen’s eggs on toasted English muffins with Hollandaise sauce and watercress

 

IMG_7431

My Avocado and Spinach Benedict: sliced avocado, raw baby spinach and two poached hen’s eggs on toasted English muffins with Hollandaise sauce and sesame

 

IMG_7434

Content after my delicious brunch

 

After a big brunch, we headed to the Victoria and Albert Museum, located only 15 minutes away. I was most excited to finally visit their famous fashion history exhibit! Coincidentally we showed up at a great time, because we were able to take part of a free introductory tour of the museum! The V&A has a lot to offer ranging from fashion to paintings to tapestries to artifacts and was one of my favorite museums we visited.

IMG_7443

Passing a Private Garden

 

IMG_7444

No playing of ball games here!

 

IMG_7445

So many pigeons

 

IMG_7446

Victoria and Albert Museum

 

IMG_7447

Medieval & Renaissance 1350 -1600

 

IMG_7508

“Samson Slaying a Philistine” Giovanni Bologna, about 1562

 

IMG_7449

“Tippoo’s Tiger” Musical semi-automation from the 1790s: when visitors turned the handle at the side, noises were produced that supposedly imitated the European victim’s dying wails of agony

 

IMG_7453

Back view of a Court mantua 1755-60; Fashion doll from 1755-60

 

IMG_7457

In Society 1810 -1830

 

IMG_7461

At Home 1830 – 1840: additional sleeve support!

 

IMG_7465

Taking the Air 1790 – 1820

 

IMG_7468

The White Wedding 1840 – 1860

 

IMG_7471

Fashion and Industry 1850 – 1870: a dress to die for! In 1869 the British Medical Journal warned of the dangers of arsenic in magenta dye.

 

IMG_7477

Dolman by Emile Pingat, 1885, silk voided velvet trimmed with Arctic fox fur and silk chenille fringe

 

IMG_7479

Evening dress by Lucile, 1912, silk chiffon and silk satin trimmed with metal thread embroidery, sequins and silk tassel

 

IMG_7482

The Cult of the Kimono 1905 – 1915

 

IMG_7485

Bright Young Things 1920 – 1930

 

IMG_7490

Evening ensemble by Elsa Schiaparelli, 1938, silk velvet embroidered with rhinestones, sequins, and gilded silver threads

 

IMG_7492

Evening coat by Elsa Schiaparelli, 1937, is it a profusion of roses in an urn or two faces in profile? Based on a drawing by Jean Cocteau

 

IMG_7495

‘Zemire’ evening ensemble by Christian Dior, 1954

 

IMG_7499

Revolution 1960 – 1970

 

IMG_7500

Ice Blue and Spring Green Chandelier by Dale Chihuly, 1999

 

IMG_7518

One of the Dacre Beasts from between 1507 – 1525, with the Raphael Cartoons in the background

 

IMG_7523

Golden spoon from 1600, from the Mughal empire

 

We had a bit of time left before our dinner reservation and headed to the Science Museum. It wasn’t my favorite museum, but I really enjoyed the exhibit about Cravings. Plus all the museums in London are free, so why not?

IMG_7531

Science Museum

 

IMG_7536

Cravings exhibit

 

IMG_7537

Edible work of art in progress

 

IMG_7538

Meal presentation inspired by Kandinsky

 

IMG_7539

Koen taking the Craving Commander quiz

 

IMG_7540

Can’t get enough of that umami flavor

 

IMG_7544

Design Diversity – Minimal Motoring 1950 – 1965

 

IMG_7546

IMG_7547

IMG_7548

Finally time for dinner! We were very happy to score a reservation at St. John, the Michelin star restaurant from Fergus Henderson. Both the chef and the restaurant are famous for the use of offal and other neglected cuts of meat, because of his philosophy of nose to tail eating. I was really daring with my main course, ordering goat faggots, a sort of meatball made from goat liver, heart, and other organs.

IMG_7549

St. John

 

IMG_7551

Bar downstairs

 

IMG_7552

Bakery downstairs

 

IMG_7554

My starter: venison with a salad of celeriac

 

IMG_7555

Koen’s starter: roasted bone marrow served with a parsley salad and toast

 

IMG_7556

My main: goat faggots with root mash

 

IMG_7557

Koen’s main: roasted pig shoulder with crackling and prunes

 

IMG_7558

Our sides: cabbage and potatoes

 

After dinner we were ready to go to our first pub! Since we were staying Notting Hill, we wanted to go to a local pub. We did a bit of searching and decided on The Churchill Arms, a pub dating back to 1750 which the grandparents of Winston Churchill used to visit! When we arrived the entire pub was watching a rugby match. I don’t really know the rules or anything, but it was exciting to be in the midst of the excitement!

IMG_7559

The Churchill Arms

 

IMG_7563

Cornish Orchards cider and London Pride

 

IMG_7564

Watching the rugby match

 

IMG_7568

My view!

 

IMG_7571

Enjoying my cider

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s